Teach writing? Then you’d better BE writing.

I told my husband that he needed to come with me for an evening canoe ride. We were vacationing at our cabin, and although I was working very hard at not working, I was also working on a piece of writing that had to get done. And I needed to bounce some ideas off of him.

We paddled up the lake a bit, the late sun bright and low, the water calm and clear. My mind was racing with an idea that had come to me in the middle of a sleepless night, and I thought it might work but I needed to verbalize it first, needed to hear it aloud before I could be sure.

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Fortunately my husband is used to this, as I often ask him to just listen while I try out an idea on him; sometimes it’s my writing, often it’s an idea for a lesson for my students. We reached the end of the lake and he listened while I ran through my idea. Saying it aloud not only helped me get clear on what I was thinking; it also gave me the opportunity to get feedback from someone else. And by the time we tied up the canoe at our dock, I was confident and ready to get these new ideas on paper.

I’ve been doing a lot of writing this summer, far more than usual, and it has reminded me (again and again) how important it is that, as a writing teacher, I am also writing. It seems so obvious: how can I really understand and teach the writing process if I am not experiencing it myself? But for many years I taught writing without actually writing myself. I gave students assignments; I gave them graphic organizers; I gave them feedback on their drafts; and I gave them grades. But what I didn’t give them was honest writing practice based on my own writing struggles. And, yes, writing is a struggle. Every time we put pen to paper (or, let’s be honest, fingers to keyboard), it is a struggle. It is making something out of nothing. It is creating something new. It is an art and a science and a production.

So when I tell my husband, “I’m going for a walk. I need to get away from my writing in order to find my writing again,” it’s only fair that I make a mental note: how can I let my students “go for a walk” so they can find their writing again, too?

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The writing classroom needs to be quiet, of that I’m sure. Writing is hard work, it requires concentration, and when writers are interrupted by noise, it takes a Herculean effort to find the writing again. So during writing time, I insist on a quiet writing classroom. So how can I give my students opportunities like I needed to go for a canoe ride or a walk, or to talk out their ideas with someone? Here are a few ways I try to support their writing needs:

  • in our flexible seating classroom, students are able to get up and move when they need to. They know that they need to be quiet, but they also know the value of movement as part of the creative process. Our furniture is on wheels, which allows them to move even as they write, but they are also free to get up and move, to walk around, even go outside (weather permitting) to walk a little.
  • we use Google Docs for most of our writing, so my students are able to bounce ideas off their friends via comments on their Docs. I also jump into their Docs during writing time so I can give them feedback as they work, rather than waiting until an entire draft is written and turned in.
  • homework: debate rages over whether or not homework is beneficial or even necessary for our students, but I am certain that writing for homework is critical, if only because it allows my students to figure out how they write (work) best. During NaNoWriMo, I have my students reflect on what they are learning about their own writing preferences; their answers help them see how they can work best on any assignment. They discover if they work best with music, with quiet, with snacks, and what time of day is ideal. These are discoveries that will help them now and in future work endeavors.

I may not be able to send my students out in canoes when they need a writing break, but I can learn from my own writing needs so that I can help my students find theirs. How about you? What have you learned about writing from your own writing experiences?

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6 comments

  1. As a professional writer and a former high school writing teacher, I love this essay. I learned much about my own process and theirs from writing with my students. Sometimes I did the same assignments I gave them, sometimes I worked on my own projects that I would share with the class.

    Ironically, it was from teaching writing that I realized I had to leave teaching in order to pursue my own writing career. Nine books and thousands of articles/ essays/ blog posts later, I still miss the rigors and pleasures of writing along with my students. It moves me profoundly when I get to know my former students as adults and see how they still love writing and literature.

    You’re an outstanding teacher, Laura. You were once in my class — now I wish I could be in yours!

    — Joan Price, http://www.joanprice.com/

    1. Thank you so much, Joan! As you know, your impact on my writing has been significant. Not only did you make me feel like a writer, but you inspired me to try to pass that on to teens as well. What a tremendous legacy you left at PHS, and what a rewarding career it’s been for me, too.

  2. AWESOME post, Laura. I feel it is relevant for all grade levels. What will be different is the complexity of thwriting based on the grade level. I think it would be wonderful if this process started in the primary grades!

    A thought: I would provide this post as an additional handout for your keynote presentation this August. I would include the photos, too, as it brings reality to the concepts: real people. Perhaps, the District could print them for you.

    Great picture of Doug!!

    1. Correction: As a perfectionist, I meant ” . . . the complexity of the writing . . .”

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